AACS 2019 Annual Conference Schedule

The PDF version of the schedule is HERE!

Directions for use:

  • This schedule is organized in the following order: day, session period, session, and individual presentations/workshops/panel/meeting cards.
  • Presentation cards contain the following information: presentation title, authors, affiliation, conference location, theme, professional track, and presiders. Click on an individual presentation card to see all additional information.
  • Workshops, panels, meals, plenaries, and special events contain additional information. Select the individual presentation cards for more!
  • Sessions can be searched by theme, professional track, title, and presenter by using their respective search bar below. Multiple search terms can be combined to narrow down choices.
  • To save sessions or meetings, select which presentations you would like to see by clicking the star icon in the upper, left-hand corner. Select “show my picks” to record your selection. The same browser must be used when selecting and reviewing your picks. Cookies must not be cleared.
Search:

Thursday 17 Oct 2019

8:00 am – 12:00 pm AACS Board Meeting

AACS Board Meeting

Metolius River

Thu 8:00 am – 12:00 pm

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Presider Training Session 1

Presider Training Session 1

Crooked River

Student participants in the presider program should attend one of two training sessions. At the session, you will receive instructions and materials for your duties as an AACS presider. You should RSVP for a specific session by emailing Lindy Hern at aacsprogram@gmail.com.

Thu 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

12:30 pm – 4:00 pm Registration

Registration Day 1

Hotel Atrium

Thu 12:30 pm – 4:00 pm

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm Workshop: CAPACS Accreditation Review Committee & Site Visit Team Training Workshop

Workshop 6- CAPACS Accreditation Review Committee & Site Visit Team Training Workshop

Michael Fleischer– Organizational DynamicsCrater Lake

This workshop requires additional registration. The form can be found HERE!

This workshop is for new Commissioners who will be joining the CAPACS Board of Directors; current Commissioners as a “refresher” course; and members of AACS and other professional sociologists who are interested in participating in CAPACS accreditation reviews and site visits for evaluating higher education programs in applied, clinical, engaged public sociology, and sociological practice. Participants who complete the workshop will learn the skills for serving as “accreditors” and “site visitors” on Commission accreditation review committees, and will be eligible to join the CAPACS Board.

With over 30 years of experience as an applied and clinical sociologist, AACS President and CAPACS Chair, Dr. Michael Fleischer, owner of Organizational Dynamics, has provided public and private sector organizations with practical solutions to meet their missions, visions, and goals.
Thu 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm Workshop: Program Evaluation 101

Workshop 2- Program Evaluation 101

Lorella Palazzo– Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research InstituteUmpqua River

This workshop requires additional registration. This can be found HERE!

This workshop involves skill building for effective evaluation which is critical to improving private and public programs and is increasingly demanded by program stakeholders. This workshop will provide participants with knowledge, skills, and practices they can use to conduct their own evaluations for program improvement and advocacy.

Lorella Palazzo is a Research Associate at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute. Her sociological research focuses on health care improvement. She has an extensive background on alternative modes of healing and their integration into healthcare delivery systems.
Thu 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm Workshop: Sharing Your Expertise: Media and Op Ed Training

Workshop 1- Sharing Your Expertise: Media and Op Ed Training

Miriam Boeri–Bentley UniversityRogue River

This workshop requires additional registration. The form can be found HERE!

This workshop is for participants who are looking to join a national network of scholars connecting to the media, building relationships with members of the media, and/or learning how to write op-eds that get published. The workshop is great for all scholars, whether they have worked in media, written op-ed pieces, or are just starting to think about public engagement.

Miriam Boeri has over 20 years of ethnographic studies on drug user environments. She is the author of numerous journals and two books. She is currently an Associate Professor at Bentley University, and is a member of the Scholars Strategy Network, based on Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Thu 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm Workshop: Systematic Focus Groups for Academic and Policy Research

Workshop 5- Systematic Focus Groups for Academic and Policy Research

Janet Billson–Group Dimensions InternationalCascadia

This workshop requires additional registration. The form can be found HERE!

This interactive workshop will help participants identify the uses of systematic focus group discussions as an important qualitative research tool in research, monitoring and evaluation, and policy analysis. Following an in-depth exploration of group facilitation theory, participants will use their new knowledge to moderate a mock focus group with feedback from the workshop leader and other participants. Discussion of how to approach focus group data analysis rounds out the session.

Dr. Janet Mancini Billson is Director of Group Dimensions International and former Professor of Sociology at The George Washington University. Since 1981, Dr. Billson has conducted social policy research and served a variety of clients on international development, including the World Bank Group and the United Nations Office of Inspection and Evaluation, on education, health, and environmental issues.
Thu 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Presider Training Session 2

Presider Training Session 2

Crooked River

Student participants in the presider program should attend one of two training sessions. At the session, you will receive instructions and materials for your duties as an AACS presider. You should RSVP for a specific session by emailing Lindy Hern at aacsprogram@gmail.com.

Thu 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm Workshop: Crafting Your Sociological Brand

Workshop 3- Crafting Your Sociological Brand

Gary David– Bentley UniversityRogue River

This workshop requires additional registration. The form can be found HERE!

This workshop will provide workshop participants with a variety of social media branding strategies and approaches for individual and professional branding. The workshop will discuss how participants can turn their academic papers into broader-based content for distribution to targeted audiences, and explore how they can create their personal brand as sociologists, using the passion of the “sociological imagination” as a value proposition and key differentiator to different audiences.

Gary David is a Professor of Sociology, Certified Clinical Sociologist, and private consultant. He conducts ethnographic research in a variety of settings.
Thu 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm Workshop: Grantsmanship for Qualitative and Mixed Methods Proposals

Workshop- Grantsmanship for Qualitative and Mixed Methods Proposals

Karen Albright– University of DenverUmpqua River

This workshop requires additional registration. The form can be found HERE!

This workshop orients participants to the steps involved in grantsmanship and translates the merits and purpose of qualitative data to public and private agencies (e.g., the National Institutes of Health, the National Institute of Justice, and the National Science Foundation). Also covered are elements of research design and methods and the pros and cons of different qualitative data collection techniques that can be included in proposals. Other topics include qualitative budget and grant review considerations. Examples of funded proposals that include qualitative methods will be presented.

Dr. Karen Albright is a sociologist, professor, health services researcher, and the Co-Director of the consulting firm Lacuna Analytics, where she is focused on data translation and implementation She is also the founder of the Qualitative Research Methods Forum, an inter-institutional forum for qualitative health researchers.
Thu 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

4:00 pm – 5:30 pm Client Problem Competition (CPC) Meeting

Client Problem Competition Meeting

Crooked River

In this session, this year’s local Client will present information on their programmatic agenda, goals, and issues. They will unveil the problem for the Client Problem Solving Competition along with a rubric that the Client will use to judge a winning team. To be fair to other teams (and any students wishing to participate), any team missing from this event will not be considered to win the competition on Saturday when students present their solutions. Attendees will be given the opportunity for Q&A with the client, which offers ideal opportunity for the student teams to gain detailed knowledge about the agency and its working processes. It is the responsibility of the Faculty Sponsors to have their students present on the first day when the Client shares the problem.

Thu 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

5:30 pm – 7:30 pm Welcome Reception and Poster Session

Assessing the Perceived Need for a Human Trafficking-Specific Trauma Treatment Method: A Work in Progress

Danielle DiMuzio–Clemson UniversityMetolius River

Thu 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Changes in Gender Bias from the DSM-III to the DSM-5

Christi Sporl and Lacey J. Ritter–Wingate UniversityMetolius River

Thu 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Criminal Trespass in Travis County

Willis West–University of Texas at AustinMetolius River

Thu 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Exploring the Relationship between Privacy, Host Reputation, and Consumer Demand on Airbnb

Aubrey Johnson–Clemson UniversityMetolius River

Thu 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Fatal Encounters: A Content Analysis of Newspaper Depictions of the Deaths of Unarmed People of Color at the Hands of Law Enforcement or Security Personnel

Deanna Koepke–University of Providence in Great FallsMetolius River

Thu 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Gumising: The Process of Developing Critical Consciousness Among Filipinx College Students

Lainey Sevillano–University of Texas at AustinMetolius River

Thu 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Healthcare Career Ladder Program Outcomes: Do Managers and Workers Feel the Same?

Nusrat Islam–University of AkronMetolius River

Thu 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Interagency Collaboration and Burn-out in Human Services

Scott Foor and Christa Moore–University of Virginia at WiseMetolius River

Thu 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Lead Lined: Race and Vulnerability in Flint, Michigan

Connor Chapman–Rowan UniversityMetolius River

Thu 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Making Meaning and Community Transformation: Negotiating Mentorship Programs in Low-Income Public Schools in the Bible Belt

Lacey J. Ritter, Catherine Wright, and Candace Lapan–Wingate UniversityMetolius River

Thu 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Medical Interventions During Childbirth: Implementing Military Maternity Group Patient Education Program

Morgan Tamayo– Nauman University of Alabama, Birmingham; Kellie Wilkerson-Humboldt State UniversityMetolius River

Thu 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Methodological Challenges Confronting Researchers Engaged in the Study of Children of Incarcerated Parents

Sunovia Scudder and Mikenzie Lord–Rowan UniversityMetolius River

Thu 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Why Academia should teach students about psychedelics

Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion UniversityMetolius River

Thu 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

5:30 pm – 6:00 pm “Applied & Clinical Sociology Display of Tips”

“Applied & Clinical Sociology Display of Tips”

Organized by Gina Finelli–Anne Arundel Community CollegeMetolius Ballroom

All are invited to share their tips, observations, and experiences about the profession of sociological practice on an interactive visual display. This display will be located in Metolius Ballroom. Participation will start at the welcome reception on Thursday evening and end at the closing reception on Saturday evening.

Thu 5:30 pm – 6:00 pm

Friday 18 Oct 2019

8:00 am – 8:45 am Breakfast

Breakfast

Metolius River

Those staying in the conference hotel have access to a hot buffet breakfast in the atrium. You may eat in the atrium or you may bring your food to Metolius River. Non-hotel guests will need to eat prior to the morning plenaries or can inquire about breakfast vouchers from the hotel.

Fri 8:00 am – 8:45 am

8:00 am – 9:30 am Certification Demonstration

“Organizing for Medicare for All in 2019”

Stephani Nakajimi– Healthcare-NOW!Crater Lake

Stephanie will be discussing the origins of her work within the Movement for Single Payer Health Care Reform, while touching upon some of the lesser known political facts impacting progress toward Medicare for ALL. She will take us into the fascinating world of grassroots organizing with a ground level perspective of social change in progress. She will connect her lived experience as an activist to the work that we do as sociologists in academic, public, applied, and clinical settings.

Fri 8:00 am – 9:30 am

“Sociotherapy: Working to Improve the Lived Experience of LGBTQ Clients at Both the Individual and Societal Level of Intervention”

Sheila Cavanagh– York UniversityCrater Lake

Presider: Melodye Lehnerer

Committee: Jan Fritz, Christa Moore, and Debbie Phelps After the formal demonstration attendees will be invited to engage in a question and answer period.

Fri 8:00 am – 9:30 am

8:00 am – 12:00 pm Registration Day 2

Registration Day 2

Hotel Atrium

Fri 8:00 am – 12:00 pm

8:00 am – 8:00 pm Student CPC Team open meeting space

Student CPC Team open meeting space

Presidential Suite 907

Dr. Michael Fleischer, AACS President, has generously donated the Presidential Suite as a work space for student teams involved in the Client Problem Competition. This space will be available from 8 am to 8 pm on conference days. You may inquire about accessing this space at the AACS registration desk. 

Fri 8:00 am – 8:00 pm

9:00 am – 9:45 am Plenary 1

“Organizing for Medicare for All in 2019”

Stephanie NakajimaMetolius

Stephanie will be discussing the origins of her work within the Movement for Single Payer Health Care Reform, while touching upon some of the lesser known political facts impacting progress toward Medicare for ALL. She will take us into the fascinating world of grassroots organizing with a ground level perspective of social change in progress. She will connect her lived  experience as an activist to the work that we do as sociologists in academic, public, applied, and clinical settings

Ms. Stephanie Nakajima is the Director of Communications for Healthcare-NOW, a national grassroots organization working for single-payer health care reform in the United States. She previously worked as a communications consultant and journalist at the Danish Institute for Human Rights and the Danish Refugee Council in Copenhagen. Before that she was a writer, editor, and journalist in Tokyo, covering the Fukushima nuclear disaster and organized crime.
Fri 9:00 am – 9:45 am

10:00 am – 11:15 am Session Period 1

Session 1: Teaching Sociology – Applied and Otherwise

Bridging the Gap: A Report on How to “Sell” Applied Sociology to Students, and how to Connect with Practicing Sociologists Everywhere

James Lunetta– Bentley UniversityRogue River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Education
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation, Track 3: Leadership

Creating an Applied Sociology Program

Matthew Smith-Larhman and Robert Oxley– Dixie State UniversityRogue River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Education
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation, Track 3: Leadership

Teaching and Learning in a Community-Based Sociology Course with Students and Local Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Michelle Janning– Whitman CollegeRogue River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Education
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation, Track 3: Leadership

Teaching Applied Medical Sociology

J. Sumerau and Brittany Harder– University of TampaRogue River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Education
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation, Track 3: Leadership

Teaching Sociology and Social Sciences in Brazil

Isabela Kalil and Angelo– Sao Paulo School of Sociology and Political ScienceRogue River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Education
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation, Track 3: Leadership

Session 2: Workshop-Yes BA Sociologists Can Find A Job & Here Are The Secrets

Workshop: Yes BA Sociologists Can Find A Job & Here Are The Secrets

Stanley Capela–Heart Share Human Services of New YorkCascadia

The classic dilemma for students who graduate with a degree in sociology is to find a job. The purpose of this workshop is to share what an applied sociologist has learned over 40 years on what skills are needed to utilize when looking for employment.

Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Professional Practice
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Session 3: Social Design

From (Social) Science to (Social) Design and Engineering

Lubomir Popov– Bowling Green State; Franklin Goza- University of Wisconsin WhitewaterCrater Lake

Presider: Lainey Sevillano–University of Texas Austin

Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am

Social Design: Concept, Process, and Method

Lubomir Popov– Bowling Green University; Franklin Goza- University of Wisconsin WhitewaterCrater Lake

Presider: Lainey Sevillano–University of Texas Austin

Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am

Social Design: Nature, Scope, and Boundaries

Lubomir Popov– Bowling Green State UniversityCrater Lake

Presider: Lainey Sevillano–University of Texas Austin

Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am

The Social Design Project: An Explication and Articulation Format

Franklin Goza– University of Wisconsin WhitewaterCrater Lake

Presider: Lainey Sevillano–University of Texas Austin

Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am

Session 4: Patient Care: Risks and Issues in Diverse Health Care Settings

Best Practices for Care Providers to Women with HIV/AIDS

Carole Campbell–California State University Long BeachUmpqua River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Health and Environment, Organizations
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Is the US Healthcare Workforce Prepared to Met the Needs of Older Adults Graying with HIV/AIDS?

La Fleur Small– Wright State UniversityUmpqua River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Health and Environment, Organizations
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Social Inequalities, Poverty, and Mental Illness

Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion UniversityUmpqua River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Health and Environment, Organizations
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Social Workers Assert Medicare Home Health Increases Patient Risks

William Cabin– Temple UniversityUmpqua River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Health and Environment, Organizations
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Session 5: Panel Session- Third Annual Jay Weinstein Session on the Use of Theory in Applied and Clinical Sociology

Identification and refutation of authoritative neutralization techniques: An example from Jonestown

John Glass– Collin CollegeCrooked River

Presider: Delila Solis–CSU Bakersfield

This session will honor the contributions of Jay Weinstein. Jay demonstrated remarkable breadth (books on demography, social change, statistics, his understanding of theory, his concern for the study and understanding of altruism). Central to his work, Jay emphasized the value of theory in applied and clinical work. His contributions to the Society for Applied Sociology and the Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology were outstanding. He was a friend and leader to many. Jay showed us that the strength of sociology is in “doing it.”
Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Theory and Methods
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Mission, Vision, Values, and Employee Engagement: Implementing a Cultural and Structural-Functional Intervention to Address Inter-divisional Conflict and Competition for Limited Resources in Complex Organizations

Michael Fleischer– Organizational DynamicCrooked River

Moderated by Stephen Steele– Ann Arundel Community College

Presider: Delila Solis–CSU Bakersfield

This session will honor the contributions of Jay Weinstein. Jay demonstrated remarkable breadth (books on demography, social change, statistics, his understanding of theory, his concern for the study and understanding of altruism). Central to his work, Jay emphasized the value of theory in applied and clinical work. His contributions to the Society for Applied Sociology and the Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology were outstanding. He was a friend and leader to many. Jay showed us that the strength of sociology is in “doing it.”
Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Theory and Methods
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Sneaking Theory In

Roger Strauss– Blackstone GroupCrooked River

Moderated by Stephen Steele– Ann Arundel Community College

Presider: Delila Solis–CSU Bakersfield

This session will honor the contributions of Jay Weinstein. Jay demonstrated remarkable breadth (books on demography, social change, statistics, his understanding of theory, his concern for the study and understanding of altruism). Central to his work, Jay emphasized the value of theory in applied and clinical work. His contributions to the Society for Applied Sociology and the Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology were outstanding. He was a friend and leader to many. Jay showed us that the strength of sociology is in “doing it.”
Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Theory and Methods
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

The Power of Concepts

Janet Billson– Global Dimensions InternationalCrooked River

Moderated by Stephen Steele– Ann Arundel Community College

Presider: Delila Solis–CSU Bakersfield

This session will honor the contributions of Jay Weinstein. Jay demonstrated remarkable breadth (books on demography, social change, statistics, his understanding of theory, his concern for the study and understanding of altruism). Central to his work, Jay emphasized the value of theory in applied and clinical work. His contributions to the Society for Applied Sociology and the Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology were outstanding. He was a friend and leader to many. Jay showed us that the strength of sociology is in “doing it.”
Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Theory and Methods
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Session 6: Workshop- Site Mapping Methodology for practitioners, academics, and students

Site Mapping Methodology for practitioners, academics, and students

Michele Companion– University of Colorado Colorado Springs; Kathy Stolley– Virginia Wesleyan UniversityMetolius

Site mapping is an important sociological methodology. It allows local resources to be identified, which can help to bridge local organizations with opportunities for collaboration, facilitates data gathering, and improves analytical insights into specific problems and possible resolutions. This methodology is viable at the local neighborhood or community levels, as well as at the broader institutional and more macro levels. This session will discuss the various uses and practical application of this type of methodology. For example, site mapping has been used to identify community food resources in low-income neighborhoods. This has allowed community leaders, NGOs, and residents to identify gaps in food access and create locally empowered solutions to address them. This site mapping data then provided the base demonstration of community need for development grant applications submitted to the USDA. Site mapping can also be used in institutional analysis to identify gaps in service coverage. Site mapping is a powerful way to engage students in course related and educational activities as well. This session will discuss the basics of site mapping methodology, along with relevant applications.

Fri 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Theory and Methods
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

11:30 am – 12:45 pm Session Period 2

Session 7: Community Engaged and Action Oriented Education

Collaborative Learning, Augmentation in Socio-Intellectual Status, Action Transformation and Generation of Empathetic Attitude and Behavior

Muhammad Haque, Timberlee Howell, and Ally Sonnier–McNeese State UniversityRogue River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Education
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge, Track 3: Leadership

Developing Global Citizenship for Future Professionals

David Barry–University of Wisconsin Stevens PointRogue River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Education
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge, Track 3: Leadership

Fostering Sociological Imagination and Perspective-Taking Among Undergraduate Students: Findings from a multidisciplinary, community-engaged research mentoring program

Cathleen Appelt, Jessica Devido, and Andrew Simpson– Duquesne UniversityRogue River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Education
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge, Track 3: Leadership

Knowing by Doing: Engaging First-Year Students in “Hands On” Sociology

Colin Suchland–Lincoln Land Community CollegeRogue River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Education
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge, Track 3: Leadership

Medical Specialty Camps: Exploring the Impact of Service-Learning

Takeyra Collins–Virgina Weslyan UniversityRogue River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Education
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge, Track 3: Leadership

Session 8: RC 46 Workshop on Veggies Against Barriers – An interactive Workshop on (Community-) Gardening as Sociological Practice to Promote Social Change

Veggies Against Barriers – An interactive Workshop on (Community-) Gardening as Sociological Practice to Promote Social Change

Daniela Jauk- University of Akron; Sharon Severhardt–Troy University; Brenda Gill–Alabama State UniversityCascadia

In this interactive workshop we are calling on all sociological gardeners and maybe/wannabe/non-gardeners interested in exploring organic food production as subject of applied sociological research. We intend to create an open learning environment allowing for a broad variety of topics and new connection to be made. These can range from food insecurity, healing landscapes, community garden movements, CSAs, prison gardens, horticultural therapy, (urban) farming, to green industries and food and environmental justice. Short: all things “applied sociological gardening.”
One major angle for our own work are intersections of gender, food industrial complex prison industrial complex. We are currently conducting a comparative research project within the framework of applied sociology that aims to provide support, empowerment and education for women in correctional settings. Sharon Everhardt (Troy University) is currently building a garden in a women’s prison in Alabama. As sociologist in a practice setting Daniela Jauk (Oriana House, Inc) is currently establishing a garden in a women’s community corrections facility in a parallel effort. We have a comparative mixed methods approach to both projects and will welcome feedback and input on preliminary results of the projects and their evolving feminist methodological designs.
What are you working on? (How) Is food a topic in your teaching and research? (How) are you gardening? (How) can gardening be an act of social resistance? (How) do you see environmental and social justice connecting in applied sociological work? Join us for this interactive discussion – let’s get some ideas-seeds in the ground and grow together!

Fri 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Health and Environment
RC 46 International Sociological Association Subconference, Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation, Track 3: Leadership

Session 9: Social Design Award Presentation

Social Design Award Presentation

Crater Lake

The Social Design Award session will provide an opportunity for applied sociologists to learn in detail about this year’s winner of the award, the Eskasoni Mental Health Services project team, represented by Linda Liebenberg, Ph.D., Director, Everfair Research & Evaluation Consulting Inc. She is also a scholar and Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Qualitative Methods. The Project is “Eskasoni Mental Health Services: An example of community development as a response to neoliberal limitations in mental health service provision.” This session will provide an illustration of the nature and structure of the submissions for the Social Design Award and will serve both as a benchmark and learning experience. The audience will see the transcription of the project in terms of task clusters, tasks, and sub-tasks, which will clarify the requirement for process explication. Attendees will be able to ask questions not only about the project, but also about the scope of eligible social projects and the formatting of the award submissions.

Fri 11:30 am – 12:45 pm

Session10: Demonstration of Applied/Clinical Practice- Working with Nonprofits

Developing Outcomes Measurements for Non-Profiits

Ashley Lumpkin–Anthem Inc.Umpqua River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Fri 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Organizations
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Low and Inconsistent Attendance for LGBTQ+ Non-Profit Organizations: How Variability, Benefits, and Breaking Down Barriers Can Increase Event Participation

Suzanne Stoelting, Natalie Olinske, Grace Amann, and Sarah Burmester–Lindenwood UniversityUmpqua River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Fri 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Organizations
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

On Doing Research in Pakistan: A Primer

Michael Hirsch– Huston-Tillotson UniversityUmpqua River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Fri 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Organizations
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

We Love St. Charles Board Engagement

Suzanne Stoelting and Mariya Gaither–Lindenwood UniversityUmpqua River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Fri 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Organizations
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Session11: Panel Session on Transitioning – Projects and Programs: Working with Incarcerated Persons as Applied Sociology

Transitioning – Projects and Programs: Working with Incarcerated Persons as Applied Sociology

Stephen Steele–Anne Arundel Community College (retired); William Cabin–Temple University; Miriam Boeri– Bentley University; Meoldye Lehnere– College of Southern NevadaCrooked River

Presider: Delila Solis–CSU Bakersfield

Sociology has a place in working with incarcerated or previously incarcerated persons. This session highlights the application of sociological principles in the transition process from prison to community. Presenters will review re-entry, clinical, substance abuse and spiritual support. Those attending will better understand the challenges faced by those who experience the construction and implementation of efforts to return incarcerated persons to society.

Fri 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

1:00 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch and Keynote Address

Keynote Address: “A Positive Climate for Sociological Practice – 40 Years Later”

Janet Mancini BillsonMetolius

In this keynote address, Billson shares lessons learned from opportunities to reshape policies and programs, to revitalize organizations, and to work for positive social change. As we look toward the next 40 years, what is the profession of sociology, and what should public sociology look like?

Dr. Janet Mancini Billson is Director of Group Dimensions International and former Professor of Sociology at The George Washington University. Since 1981, Dr. Billson has conducted social policy research and served a variety of clients on international development, education, health, and environmental issues. Her work has contributed to shifts in social policy and program redevelopment nationally and internationally. Dr. Billson has published numerous books and articles, including chapters on black male identity formation in inner cities, women in development, Inuit resettlement, and using sociological research with focus group methodology to effect social policy and change.
Fri 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Presentation of the Alex Boros Award

Recipient: Deborah Phelps–Frontbonne University

Fri 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Presentation of the Robert Ezra Park Award

Recipient: Michele Companion–University of Colorado

Fri 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Social Design Award

Nominator: Lubomir Popov with Marilyn Dyck, and the 2019 Social Design Award Committee

Recipient: Eskasoni Mental Health Services project team, represented by Linda Liebenberg, Ph.D., Director, Everfair Research & Evaluation Consulting Inc. 

Liebenberg is also a scholar and Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Qualitative Methods. The Project is “Eskasoni Mental Health Services: An example of community development as a response to neoliberal limitations in mental health service provision.”
Fri 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

2:45 pm – 4:00 pm Session Period 3

Session 12: Social Location, Health, and Healthcare

“If we don’t have a lot of food in our bodies then we’re not that healthy” – Rural children’s perspectives on food and health. Findings from a qualitative study.

Anne Scheer and Jill Leonard– Southern Illinois UniversityRogue River

Presider: Christopher Bosley–State University of New York at Buffalo

Fri 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Health and Environment
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Culturally-Sensitive Approaches to Dying: Muslims and End-of-Life Care

Lacey Ritter–Wingate UniversityRogue River

Presider: Christopher Bosley–State University of New York at Buffalo

Fri 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Health and Environment
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Home Care Nurses Find Medicare Ignores Social Determinants of Health

William Cabin– Temple UniversityRogue River

Presider: Christopher Bosley–State University of New York at Buffalo

Fri 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Health and Environment
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Pastoral Recommendations From Conservative Religions on How to Mitigate Suicide Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth

Robert Fernquist–University of Central MissouriRogue River

Presider: Christopher Bosley–State University of New York at Buffalo

Fri 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Health and Environment,
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Session 13: Workshop- Engaging Students in Applied Sociology Through Activist Community Engagement

Engaging Students in Applied Sociology Through Activist Community Engagement

Kathleen Krueger– Anne Arundel Community College; Lindy Hern–University of Hawai’i at Hilo; Megan Floyd–University of Hawai’i at ManoaMetolius

In this session, we examine the intersection of applied Sociological methods, activist community engagement, and pedagogy, with an orientation toward specific teaching practices. Panelists will discuss their experiences as teachers, scholars, and activists, as well as the ways in which these roles intersect within the classroom. Applied sociologists are in a unique position within the field of sociology, a position in which their research and/or sociological practice can enable rather than inhibit the potential for social change, starting with classroom practices. Within the classroom applied sociologists can translate complexity into action while working with students. This session is designed as a guided workshop, as we discuss and perhaps develop techniques for teaching practices that involve activist community engagement through applied sociology. 

Short individual presentations from the panel focus on a diverse array of practices, reflecting the variety of engaged teaching techniques that exist within the world of sociological scholarship. The experiences presented also developed in distinct institutional and geographic locations. We also discuss the potential for teaching itself to be a form of scholar activism, giving our students the potential to engage sociologically, using the knowledge from their courses. This opens the session to a comparative analytical focus on the impact of institutional and geographic location on developing teaching practices oriented toward applied sociology and activist community engagement.

Fri 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Education
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation, Track 3: Leadership

Session 14: RC 46 Paper Session 1- Clinical sociology interventions I

Empowering Migrants through Leadership and Entrepreneurship: A Case Study of the Ateneo LSE Program in Tokyo

Johanna Zulueta–Soka UniversityCascadia

Presider: Fanni Farago–University of Houston

Fri 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
RC 46 International Sociological Association Subconference

Protecting South African Whistleblowers: Policy and Practice

Tina Uys–University of JohannesburgCascadia

Presider: Fanni Farago–University of Houston

Fri 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
RC 46 International Sociological Association Subconference

The Difficult Path from Theory to Practice: The Experience of the Laboratorio Di Sociologia Pratica, Applicata E Clinica

Everardo Minardi and Dr. Gianluca–Piscitelli Quaderni di Socioliologia Clinica, Rome, ItalyCrater Lake

Presider: Fanni Farago–University of Houston

Fri 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
RC 46 International Sociological Association Subconference

Session 15: Methodology and Knowledge Production: Critical Approaches

Applied Sociology and “Data Science”

Benjamin Ben-Baruch– Indepedent ScholarUmpqua River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Theory and Methods
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Connecting the Dots in Health Inequality: How voices from the margins can be used to enhance understanding and illuminate a path for action

Cathleen Appelt–Duquesne UniversityUmpqua River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Theory and Methods
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Grounding the Neoliberal Science Regime: A Subaltern Perspective of the Contemporary Culture of Science

Ashok Kumbamu– Mayo Clinic

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Theory and Methods
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Highlighting photovoice methodology as an emancipatory tool to center the voices, lived experiences, needs, and aspirations of LGBTQ former foster youth

Sarah Mountz– University of Albany; Lalaine Sevillano–University of Texas at Austin; Moshoula Capous-Desyllas–California State University NorthridgeUmpqua River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Theory and Methods
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

The Reliability and Validity of the Quality of Life Scale

Qi Jiang and Oliver Kish– Youngstown State UniversityUmqua River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Theory and Methods
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Session 16: Panel- Publishing Your Book

Publishing Your Book

Kathy Stolley–Virginia Wesleyan University; Deborah Phelps– Fontbonne University; Miriam Boeri–Bentley University; Bruce Frieson and J.E. Sumerau University of TampaCrooked River

Calling all authors! Join sociological practitioners who are published book authors for a conversation on getting your book published. Authors will share practical advice and personal experiences on the book publication process ranging from writing a proposal, to finding and working with editors, to signing the contract, to soliciting contributors and reviewers, to seeing the project through the last editing phase, to having the published book in hand. They’ll also have thoughts about the bumps in the road authors might encounter along the way. This will be an interactive session with plenty of time for questions and discussion.

Fri 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Professional Practice
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Session 17: Certification Meeting

Certification Meeting

Cascadia

Demonstrator: Joel Carr–The Harris Center for Mental Health and IDD

Presider: Melodye Lehnerer–College of Southern Nevada

Committee: Gary David, Lubo Popov, Roger Straus

Fri 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm

4:15 pm – 5:30 pm Session Period 4

Session 18: Student Paper Competition Finalist Session

Burnout and Morale Boosting: An Analysis of the Work Culture at an Applied Behavioural Analysis Center

Kaylee Fairfield–Purdue University Fort WayneRogue River

Presider:  Sarah Cumming–Sheridan College

Presider:  Fanni Farago–University of Houston

Join finalists in the AACS student paper
competition as they give short five-minute presentations of their papers. These
presentations will be oriented toward a public audience and will help the panel
of judges to choose a winner!

Fri 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm

I am not a Burden: Strategies for Creating Inclusive and Supportive Environments for Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Students

Delila Solis–CSU BakersfieldRogue River

Presider: Sarah Cumming–Sheridan College

Presider: Fanni Farago–University of Houston

Join
finalists in the AACS student paper competition as they give short five-minute
presentations of their papers. These presentations will be oriented toward a
public audience and will help the panel of judges to choose a winner!

Fri 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm

Social Inequality, Poverty and Mental Illness

Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion UniversityRogue River

Presider:  Sarah Cumming–Sheridan College

Presider:  Fanni Farago–University of Houston

Join finalists in the AACS student paper
competition as they give short five-minute presentations of their papers. These
presentations will be oriented toward a public audience and will help the panel
of judges to choose a winner!

Fri 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm

Structural Analysis of Performance and Recommendations for Performance Improvement of a University Safety an Security Agency

Anne Jensen and ZaC Christo– University of Nebraska, OmahaRogue River

Presider:  Sarah Cumming–Sheridan College

Presider:  Fanni Farago–University of Houston

Join finalists in the AACS student paper
competition as they give short five-minute presentations of their papers. These
presentations will be oriented toward a public audience and will help the panel
of judges to choose a winner!

Fri 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm

Session 19: Workshop- A Brief Therapeutic Poetry Writing Intervention for Youth who have Experienced Trauma

A Brief Therapeutic Poetry Writing Intervention for Youth who have Experienced Trauma

Kevin Jones, Ryan Martin, and Faith Marcelo–University of PortlandMetolius

Presider: Lainey Sevillano–University of Texas Austin

About four million children in the United States experience a trauma each year, and nearly two-thirds of U.S. children will experience a trauma during childhood. While most children who experience a single traumatic event will not develop symptoms of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), as many as 25% will experience multiple or repeated traumas, significantly raising the risk of PTSD. Due to structural barriers such as limited access to mental health care, children of color and children from low income families are less likely to receive treatment for PTSD and PTSS than their peers.

To address this gap, we developed a brief therapeutic poetry writing (BTP) intervention for youth who have experienced trauma based on the Pongo Teen Writing Method introduced by Gold (2014). BTP has the potential to be accessible to underserved populations because it is largely facilitated by trained volunteers. BTP is comprised of four main components: 1) Writing a group poem, 2) Writing poems one-on-one with a volunteer writing mentor, 3) Sharing participant poems with the larger group, 4) Providing printed copies of poems for youth to take home and share. In this session, we will present the theoretical and practical foundations of the BTP approach, and participants will have a chance to practice using the model by taking on the roles of both writing mentor and youth participant. The session will give participants insight into youth trauma and how creative expression through poetry writing can help promote healing for youth who have experienced stressful life events.

Fri 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm
Health and Environment
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Session 20: JASS Editorial Board Meeting

JASS Editorial Board Meeting

Crater Lake

Presider: James Lee–San Jose State University

Fri 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm

Session 21: Occupational Change and the Experience of Labor

Gender Segregation of Occupations and Automation Vulnerability

Kimberly Trevino–Baylor UniversityUmpqua River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm
Organizations
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Interagency Collaboration and Burnout in Human Services

Scott Foor and Christa Moore–University of Virginia at WiseUmpqua River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm
Organizations
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Relationship Between Organizational Size and Forms of Organizational Commitment: A multi-mediated structural analysis

Olu Oyinade and Zachary Christo–University of Nebraska, OmahaUmpqua River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm
Organizations
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Workers’ Predictions of Work Automation: Which Workers are Concerned about Automation Vulnerability?

Laura Livesey–University of HoustonUmpqua River

Presider: Ellen Meiser–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Fri 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm
Organizations
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Session 22: Panel Session on Teaching and Learning: Working with Incarcerated Persons as Applied Sociology

Teaching and Learning: Working with Incarcerated Persons as Applied Sociology

Stephen Steele–Anne Arundel Community College; Sarah Allred–Berry College; Gina Castillo–Un-Loop; Sharon Lindhorst Everhardt–Troy University; Daniela Jauk–University of AkronCrooked River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

This session outlines the processes of developing educational and training experiences for incarcerated persons. Viewing the prison as a social environment in which to work, presenters will review the challenges to the delivery and evaluation of education, skill building and personal development as applied and clinical problems. Each presenter will reveal the strategy employed to deal with these challenges.

Fri 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm
Education
Track 3: Leadership

5:30 pm – 7:30 pm Student Mixer and Trivia Challenge

Student Mixer and Trivia Challenge

Cascadia

Students are invited to attend and interact with other students, AACS board members, and interested AACS conference attendees. There will be food and refreshments provided. Make sure to arrive by 6 pm and bring your mobile device so that you can play AACS Trivia using the Kahoot App — no need to download anything ahead of time. We hope to see you there!

Fri 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

7:30 pm – 11:00 pm Special Musical Event: Turtle’s Guitar Mafia at Jack London Revue

Special Musical Event: Turtle’s Guitar Mafia

This event requires additional registration. The form can be found HERE!

"Local music legend, Turtle VanDemarr, has performed in many influential bands over the years. Lead guitarist for Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks, the Fly By Nite Jass Band, The Freak Mountain Ramblers, Anita Margarita and the Rattlesnakes to name a few. Having been a regular in the Portland Music scene since the late 60's, he is widely known for the versatility of his guitar playing styles. Turtle has been compared to Django Reinhardt and Jerry Garcia in the San Francisco Chronicle. As a member of the Oregon Music Hall of Fame, he is routinely hired by nationally touring acts. About 2 years ago he gathered together some of Portland's premier guitar players to form what is now known as "Turtle's Guitar Mafia". They play every first friday @ McMenamins Edgefield Winery and folks are loving it. A mix and match of Portland's older guitar legends with some of the hottest young-uns that have been revving up the Portland music scene. Different guitar styles, stealin' licks from each other and having way too much fun. Turtle aka known as "Zeus" is moving slow and easy and attempting to keep up with these amazing guitar slingers. Amazing to watch" (Kathryn Frederick Frederick Productions LLC, Red Newt Records, Stolen Guitar Publishing www.frederickproductions.com www.jeffreyfrederick.com)
Fri 7:30 pm – 11:00 pm

Saturday 19 Oct 2019

8:00 am – 8:45 am Breakfast

Breakfast

Metolius River

Those staying in the conference hotel have
access to a hot buffet breakfast in the atrium. You may eat in the atrium or
you may bring your food to Metolius River. Non-hotel guests will need to eat
prior to the morning plenaries or can inquire about breakfast vouchers from the
hotel.

Sat 8:00 am – 8:45 am

8:00 am – 12:00 pm Registration Day 3

Registration Day 3

Hotel Atrium

Sat 8:00 am – 12:00 pm

8:00 am – 8:00 pm Student CPC Team open meeting space

Student CPC Team open meeting space

Presidential Suite 907

Dr. Michael Fleischer, AACS President, has generously donated the Presidential Suite as a work space for student teams involved in the Client Problem Competition. This space will be available from 8 am to 8 pm on conference days. You may inquire about accessing this space at the AACS registration desk. 

Sat 8:00 am – 8:00 pm

9:00 am – 9:45 am Plenary 2

Plenary Speech: “Social Determinants of Health and Expanding the Care Delivery Model”

Tracey D. Green, MDMetolius

Dr. Green will focus on the social determinants of health and expanding the care delivery model to utilize community health workers, peers, licensed clinical social workers, community paramedics, and other professionals and specialists in the social and behavioral sciences.

Dr. Tracey D, Green is Vice President of Personalized Health at Aetna Medicaid. She formerly served as Chief Medical Officer for the Department of Health and Human Services for the State of Nevada, and Vice Dean of Clinical Affairs at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) School of Medicine.
Sat 9:00 am – 9:45 am

10:00 am – 11:15 am Session Period 5

Session 23: Roundtable on Learning from Each Other: Successes, Struggles, & Support Among Students

Learning from Each Other: Successes, Struggles, & Support Among Students

Fanni Farago–George Mason University; Laura Livesey–University of Houston; and Suezen Salinas–MD Anderson Cancer CenterMetolius

This is an opportunity for peer-mentoring in the form of an informal round-table discussion. Students of all levels are invited to join our discussion and to share their stories of successes, struggles, and ideas for better supporting one another in our professionalization journeys. Let’s convene to learn from one another’s experiences, to continue building our AACS student community, and to contribute to building a shared professional network.

Sat 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Professional Practice
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation, Track 3: Leadership

Session 24: Socialization Within Institutions

Evaluation of a Learning Community Program for Developmental Reading Students at a Two-year College

Tonya Lanphier–Southcentral Kentucky Community & Technical CollegeRogue River

Presider: Christopher Bosley–State University of New York at Buffalo

Sat 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Organizations
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Factors Contributing to the Resilience and Success of Adult College Students Who Have Been Impacted by Parental Incarceration

Sandra Joy, Sunovia Scudder, and Mikenzie Lord–Rowan UniversityRogue River

Presider: Christopher Bosley–State University of New York at Buffalo

Sat 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Helping Communities Move Past the “Daddy Daughter Dance”

Ezra Temko–Southern Illinois University EdwardsvilleRogue River

Presider: Christopher Bosley–State University of New York at Buffalo

Sat 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Session 25: Workshop on Inter-disciplinarity: Applying the Sociological Imagination across Multiple Disciplines in a Senior Seminar

Inter-disciplinarity: Applying the Sociological Imagination across Multiple Disciplines in a Senior Seminar

Sharon McCann–Rowan UniverstiyCascadia

Presider: Delila Solis–CSU Bakersfield

The Sociological Imagination is a tool useful to many disciplines and settings. The Liberal Studies program is designed to allow students to take a sequence of classes in two separate majors. The Sociology sequence was the most popular sequence, but it left the Sociology Department with a question of how to apply the skills necessary for the Sociological imagination to the skills gleaned from the students’ second sequence. This presentation will be on teaching Applied Sociology to Liberal Studies majors in Senior Seminar: Sociological Imagination (Writing Intensive).

Sat 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Education
Track 3: Leadership

Session 26: Roundtable on Brainstorming the Sustainable Development Goals–Yes, We Do Have Concepts That Count!

Brainstorming the Sustainable Development Goals–Yes, We Do Have Concepts That Count!

Janet Mancini Billson–Group Dimensions InternationalCrater Lake

Janet Mancini Billson has designed a PPT presentation on the Sustainable Development Goals. The aim of this presentation is NOT to lecture but to get participants to brainstorm concepts and theories that would help us help the world reach the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. Participants will be invited to brainstorm as many sociological concepts and theories as possible for each SDG. This is a great way to kick off theory courses and sociological practice, and to remind ourselves that, ‘YES, we do have concepts and theories that count!”

Sat 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Health and Environment
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Session 27: Analysis of Organizational Structure and Culture

Assessing Employment Culture: Drilling Down to the Day by Day through Methodological Triangulation

Michael Hirsch and Starr Lisa–Huston-Tillotson University; Gina Castillo–Un-Loop; Mueni Rudd and Gilliam Kendall–Texas State UniversityUmpqua River

Presider: Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion University

Sat 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Organizations
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Burnout and Morale Boosting: The Work Culture at an Applied Behavioral Analysis Center

Kaylee Fairfield–Purdue UniversityUmpqua River

Presider: Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion University

Sat 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Organizations
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Discretionary Collaboration as an Expression of Bureaucratic Power in Human Services

Christa Moore–University of Virgina at WiseUmpqua River

Presider: Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion University

Sat 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Organizations
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Ineffective Organizational Responses to Workers’ Secondary Traumatic Stress: A Case Study of the Effects of an Unhealthy Organizational Culture and How to Remedy It

Sarah Jirek–Westmont CollegeUmpqua River

Presider: Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion University

Sat 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Organizations
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Organizational Structural Analysis for Effectiveness and Efficiency at a University Public Safety Department

Zachary Christo, Anna Jensen, and Katie Haynes–University of Nebraska OmahaUmpqua River

Presider: Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion University

Sat 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Organizations
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Session 28: Panel Session- Issues in Applied Sociology

Issues in Applied Sociology

Bruce Friesen and Bridget Maloney–University of Tampa; Morgan Tamayo and Dinesh Bogati–University of Alabama at BirminghamCrooked River

Presider: Nusrat Islam–University of Akron

Panelist presentations deal with current issues in applied sociology. They include an examination of how applied researchers make use of sociological theory, an investigation into how data are being used as a tool to advocate for gender equity, issues migrant farm workers face in the U.S., and the relationship between capitalism and climate change.

Sat 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Professional Practice
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

11:30 am – 12:45 pm Session Period 6

Session 29: Examining the Health Care Institution

Home Care Executives Say “Less Is Better” Philosophy Drives Medicare Home Health

William Cabin–Temple UniversityRogue River

Presider: Megan Floyd–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Sat 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Health and Environment
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Mental Health on the Big Island of Hawaii

Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawai’i at HiloRogue River

Presider: Megan Floyd–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Sat 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Health and Environment
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Occupational Influences on EMS Provider Empathy

Christopher Bosley–University at BuffaloRogue River

Presider: Megan Floyd–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Sat 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Health and Environment
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Simulations: An Innovative Tool for Leadership Development

Suezen Salinas–MD Anderson Cancer CenterRogue River

Presider: Megan Floyd–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Sat 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Health and Environment
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Sociologists and anthropologists in health care settings: practices, contributions, and possibilities

Lorello Palazzo, Nora Henrikson, Marlaine Gray, and Brooks Tiffany– Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research InstituteRogue River

Presider: Megan Floyd–University of Hawaii at Manoa

Sat 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Health and Environment
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Session 30: Workshop- Podcasting and Public Sociology: Alternative Forms of Knowledge

Podcasting and Public Sociology: Alternative Forms of Knowledge

Ellen Meiser and Omar Bird– University of Hawai’i at ManoaCascadia

Formally recognized in 1988, Public Sociology is a nascent field still eking out its stake in the discipline and finding new ways to reach the public. Perhaps due to such young history, many sociologists still refrain from actively pursuing public sociology. This hesitation is due, in large part, to requirements that the Ivory Tower has place upon sociologists who desire to be successful within academia, which predominantly focuses on research and publishing. This presentation will tackle a new avenue within the expanding landscape of public sociology: Podcasts. Podcasts have emerged as an alternative to traditional radio, allowing listeners to access entertaining and informative content on various smart devices based on their own schedules. While cultivating personal intimacy between hosts and listeners, podcasts can thousands of people. We will examine how the utilization of this audio technology can allow sociologists to reach a broader general audience as an alternative educational and public outreach tool. We will compare podcasts to other forms of social media (i.e. Twitter and blogs), as well as touch on our experiences creating a sociology podcast called The Social Breakdown. Finally, we will guide attendees in the creation of their own mini podcasts, from initial show concept to final edited product. We aim to demonstrate how audio productions of public sociology, like podcasts, can act to, as Michael Burawoy (2004) says, “complement and not… negat[e] professional sociology.”

Sat 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Theory and Methods
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge, Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Session 31: RC 46 Paper Session 2 on Clinical sociology interventions II

Elizabeth Briant Lee, Ph.D. and the History of Clinical Sociology and RC 46

Judith Gordon–Yale UniversityCrater Lake

Presider: Nusrat Islam–University of Akron

Sat 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Professional Practice
RC 46 International Sociological Association Subconference, Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Psychosociogenetics in social therapy: Russian case

Natalia Erokhova–RUDN University, Moscow; Margarita Kalashnikova–St. Tikhon’s Orthodox UniversityCrater Lake

Presider: Nusrat Islam–University of Akron

Sat 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Professional Practice
RC 46 International Sociological Association Subconference, Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Sexual Violence in Japan and its Countermove

Sakura Imamura and Minami Nakane–Soka UniversityCrater Lake

Presider: Nusrat Islam–University of Akron

Sat 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Professional Practice
RC 46 International Sociological Association Subconference, Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Session 32: Social Problems and Social Change

A Pirate Looks At 25: Changes in Attitudes and Latitudes at a Non-Research 1 University Applied Sociology Research Center.

Jeffry Will–University of North FloridaUmpqua River

Presider: Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion University

Sat 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Track 3: Leadership

Participatory Philanthropy as a Springboard: Examining the Merits of Grassroots Giving to Enhance Civic Participation

Zachary Wood–Seattle UniversityUmpqua River

Presider: Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion University

Sat 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Track 3: Leadership

Service eligibility for Homeless individuals

Curt Smith–Bentley UniversityUmpqua River

Presider: Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion University

Sat 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Track 3: Leadership

Voices from the Street

Marilyn Dyck–The Doorway; Jill Rosenbaum–California State University FullertonUmpqua River

Presider: Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion University

Sat 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Track 3: Leadership

Session 33: Panel Session- Sociology and the Experience Economy: Understanding and Improving Customer, Patient, and Employee Experience through Sociological Application

Sociology and the Experience Economy: Understanding and Improving Customer, Patient, and Employee Experience through Sociological Application

Karen Albright–University of Denver; Ashley Lumpkin-Anthem; Gary David–Bentley UniversityCrooked River

Presider: Fanni Farago–University of Houston

In recent years, there has been increased focus on user experience among companies interested in understanding consumers’ interactions with their services and products. This attention to experience has taken on different emphases in different domains. The field of customer experience has developed to focus particularly on consumer experiences that are personalized and integrated to seem effortless. In health care organizations, the cultural shift toward the consumer has resulted in an increased interest in patient experience, the sum of all interactions that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care. Companies have also begun to realize that employee experience is critical to a productive work environment, contributing significantly to the experience of the customers with whom employees interact. These experience domains are rife with opportunities for sociologists. The application of sociological perspectives and tools allows for a more comprehensive understanding of customer, patient, and employee experience, enabling organizations to address problems through the design and implementation of effective and relevant solutions.

Sat 11:30 am – 12:45 pm
Organizations
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

1:00 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch and Presidential Address

Presentation of the Lester F. Ward Award

Recipient: Joyve Ann Miller–Keystone Research

Sat 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Presentation of the Paul Wellstone Award

Nominator: Curtis Smith and the CPSC Committee

Recipient: Transition Projects of Portland, Oregon and Stephani Cabrera– Manager of Retention Services

Sat 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Presentation of the William Julius Wilson Award

Recipient: Marilyn Dyke–The Doorway

Sat 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Presidential Address: “The Profession of Sociological Practice”

Michael FleischerMetolius

Dr. Fleischer’s Presidential Address will discuss the significant momentum applied and clinical sociologists have marshalled in “professionalizing” sociological practice in the last quarter century with the establishment of the Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology (AACS) and the Commission on the Accreditation of Programs in Applied and Clinical Sociology (CAPACS). 

With over 30 years of experience as a certified practicing sociologist, Dr. Michael S. Fleischer, owner and director of Organizational Dynamics Consulting in Morristown, New Jersey, is President of the Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology (AACS), and Chair of the Commission on the Accreditation of Programs in Applied and Clinical Sociology (CAPACS).
Sat 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

2:45 pm – 4:00 pm Session Period 7

Session 34: CPC Presentations

CPC Presentations

Crooked River

Presider: Curtis Smith–Bentley University

Join the Client Problem Competition teams as they present their solutions to the client. This should be an engaging session for anyone interested in the application of sociology to solve real world problems – which is all of us right?

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm

Session 35: Education and Success: Intersecting Factors

A preliminary study of students’ perceptions about diversity and racial/ethnic climate on their college campus

Meiko Yamad and Kenneth McKee–Purdue UniversityRogue River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Education
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Getting a Job with Sociology by taking SALT – Skills, Articulation, Language and Trends: Reinvention

Stephen Steele–Anne Arundel Community College (retired)Rogue River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Education
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Quality of Life and Participation in School Based Athletics

Mary-Eilee Dunn–Youngstown State UniversityRogue River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Education
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Sociology Beyond the Ivory Tower: Non-Academic Career Patterns and Their Implications for Sociological Training

Karen Albright–University of DenverRogue River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Education
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Session 36: Workshop on the Journal of Applied Social Science: A Learning Resource to Make Students Aware of What Professional Sociologists Do

Journal of Applied Social Science: A Learning Resource to Make Students Aware of What Professional Sociologists Do

Melodye Lehnerer–College of Southern NevadaCascadia

Undergraduate students taking courses in sociology must be made aware of what professional sociologists are doing. This seems like a simple idea but too often classroom materials draw from traditional sociology sources on theory and methods. This is especially true in first- and second-year courses. This workshop is based on course instruction directed at second year students at a community college. The course draws exclusively from research articles found in the Journal of Applied Social Science. The rationale for this choice of materials is to have students early on in their academic career know about what applied and clinical sociologists are doing to make positive social change.

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Professional Practice
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Session 37: RC46 Paper Session 3 on Clinical sociology, citizen science and the environment

Building Capacity for Citizenship and Constructing Citizen Science: Case Study from Western Poland

Sauva Zbierski- Salameh Haverford InstituteCrater Lake

Presider: Fanni Farago–University of Houston

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Health and Environment
RC 46 International Sociological Association Subconference, Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Environmental Justice Issues and U.S. Prisons

Jan Marie Fritz–University of Cincinnati and University of JohannesburgCrater Lake

Presider: Fanni Farago–University of Houston

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Health and Environment
RC 46 International Sociological Association Subconference, Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Participatory Community Risk Assessment: Citizen Science for a Gendered Climate Action

Emma Porio–Ateneo de Manila UniversityCrater Lake

Presider: Fanni Farago–University of Houston

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Health and Environment
RC 46 International Sociological Association Subconference, Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Session 38: Policy, Crime, and Gender

A Multidisciplinary Approach to Understanding Mass Murder & Respective Solutions

Alison Marganski–Le Moyne CollegeUmpqua River

Presider: Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion University

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Challenges and Opportunities of Top Down Policy: A Case Study of a state system

Meredith Redlin and Mary Emery–South Dakota State UniversityUmpqua River

Presider: Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion University

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Refugee Camps as Inherently Marginalized Settlements: Rethinking Critical Policies and Essential Outcomes

Janet Mancini Billson–Global Dimensions InternationalUmpqua River

Presider: Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion University

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Sociological Insights on Leadership among Female Clergy in the Evangelical Lutheran Church (ELCA)

Deborah Phelps–Fontbonne UniversityUmpqua River

Presider: Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion University

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

The Opioid Epidemic: Research and Action in a Ground Zero Community

Melissa Fry–Indiana University SoutheastUmpqua River

Presider: Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion University

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Session 39: Applied Methods for Social Problem Solving: Demonstrations

Collaborative Learning, Augmentation in Socio-Intellectual Status, Action Transformation and Generation of Empathetic Attitude and Behavior

Muhammad Haque, Timberlee Howell, and Ally Sonnier–McNeese State UniversityMetolius

Presider: Delila Solis–CSU Bakersfield

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Theory and Methods
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Sexual Misconduct Response Centre: Performance Measurement Framework

Samantha Urban–Department of National Defence and Canadian Armed ForcesMetolius

Presider: Delila Solis–CSU Bakersfield

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Theory and Methods
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

The Nexus between health Education and Social Practices: “I want to give birth like the Hebrew women”- An inquiry into Perceptions, Beliefs, attitudes and experiences of assisted vaginal birth by young women in Nigeria

Chinwe Obuaku-Igwe–University of Western CapeMetolius

Presider: Delila Solis–CSU Bakersfield

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Theory and Methods
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

Using Popular Epidemiology to Address Mitigation Masking and Regulatory Noncompliance

Sherri Steiner–Purdue UniversityMetolius

Presider: Delila Solis–CSU Bakersfield

Sat 2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Theory and Methods
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

4:15 pm – 5:30 pm Session Period 8

Session 40: CPC Presentations

CPC Presentations

Crooked River

Join the Client Problem Competition teams as they present their solutions to the client. This should be an engaging session for anyone interested in the application of sociology to solve real world problems – which is all of us right?

Sat 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm

Session 41: Education and Social Justice

“I Am Not a Burden”: Strategies for Creating Inclusive and Supportive Environments for Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Students in Higher Education

Delila Solis–California State University BakersfieldRogue River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Sat 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm
Education
Track 3: Leadership

Awakening: Indigenous Agency, Decolonization & Survivance

Tricia Hornback–George Fox UniversityRogue River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Sat 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm
Education
Track 3: Leadership

Enabling Sexual Assault Prevention and Reporting at Maryland Colleges and Universities

Amanda Koch–University of Maryland Baltimore CountyRogue River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Sat 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm
Education
Track 3: Leadership

Quantifying the Relationship Between Gender Inequality and Human Trafficking Response

Danielle DiMuzio–Clemson UniversityRogue River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Sat 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm
Education
Track 3: Leadership

Sex and Advocacy: Public Sociology for Sexual Justice

Marilyn Preston–Grand Valley State UniversityRogue River

Presider: Alexandra Koenig–University of Hawaii at Hilo

Sat 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm
Education
Track 3: Leadership

Session 42: Workshop-Leadership Development and Enhancement

Workshop on Leadership Development and Enhancement

A. Olu Oyinlade–University of Nebraska OmahaCascadia

Presider: Fanni Farago–University of Houston

Studies of leadership have identified and described leadership in various forms, types and/or classifications. Those descriptions have included transactional, transformational, agentic, communal, and many more. However, a careful review of leadership studies reveals a common conflation of management with leadership. While the two concepts are arguably interrelated, they are still decisively different. Several authors have established that management is NOT leadership, and it should not be substituted for leadership. Management deals specifically with certain organizationally prescribed bureaucratic functions (such as planning, scheduling, supervision, hiring, firing, presiding, allocating, reporting, etc.), while leadership describes behavioral patterns or relationships that are valued by workers and are likely to transform workers from subordinates to followers, and consequently, managers into leaders. While a good manager gets compliance from subordinates through authorized power, the leader gets voluntary compliance from followers through endorsed power obtained through certain leadership behaviors and relationships with followers. While management functions are still necessary in organizations, several studies have established that teams led by leaders far outperform those managed by managers. Hence, American businesses will be more successful with leaders, than managers, at the helm of operations. The question, now, is, what are those specific behaviors that may transform subordinates into followers, and consequentially transform the manager into a leader? This workshop is designed to give specific guides on specific behaviors that will most likely produce leadership, based on many years of conducting research, learning and teaching about structural factors of organizational and leadership performance.

Sat 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm
Professional Practice
Track 2: Career Exploration and Preparation

Session 43: RC 46 Business Meeting

RC 46 Business Meeting

Crater Lake

Sat 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm
RC 46 International Sociological Association Subconference

Session 44: Panel- Evolving Politics in a Social Justice Movement: Lessons from Cannabis Legalization

Evolving Politics in a Social Justice Movement: Lessons from Cannabis Legalization

Amber Langston, Dominic Corva, Adam Smith, and Derek Smith– Resource Innovation InstituteUmpqua River

Presider: Lesley Richardson–Old Dominion University

In 1996, California became the first state to legalize marijuana for medical use. By 2012, state legal medical cannabis laws in the US jumped to nineteen. That same year, Colorado and Washington passed the first laws legalizing production, sale, distribution, and consumption of cannabis for adults 21 years of age and older. As of 2019, ten states (plus the District of Columbia) had legalized adult-use cannabis, a full thirty-three states allowed for medical cannabis, and federal legislation was passed to exempt the cannabis-derived compound CBD from the Controlled Substances Schedules.

The movement for cannabis legalization was founded and grounded in a community committed to social justice – reforming racist and draconian drug laws, improving the lives of sick patients, creating a more ecologically sustainable future, and supporting local agricultural economies. In the past two decades, the demographics of the “cannabis community” have rapidly shifted from one based in group activism to one heavily influenced by capitalistic concerns.

This panel will explore the opportunities and challenges of utilizing the shift in popular opinion regarding the cannabis plant to influence public policy to continue the foundational efforts of building a more socially just future.

Sat 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm
Track 1: Foundations of Disciplinary Knowledge

6:00 pm – 7:30 pm Closing Reception: Student Awards and AACS Business

Closing Reception: Student Awards and AACS Business

Metolius River

Join us at the closing reception where we will present the student paper and poster awards as well as deal with a few small items of AACS Business – including passing the baton to the 2019/2020 executive team! We will share some final fellowship — with food and refreshments – before we part ways until October 2020 in Atlanta!

Sat 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Sunday 20 Oct 2019

8:00 am – 12:00 pm AACS Board Meeting

AACS Board Meeting

Crooked River

Sun 8:00 am – 12:00 pm
FacebooktwitterlinkedinFacebooktwitterlinkedin